Hookworm working, feeling great!

Today I’m 10 1/2 weeks into a 75 hookworm dose. As far as I know, I had no worms remaining when I did that top off, because stool tests for ova were negative at the time, but I have had blood work done recently suggesting the new dose is alive and well. My EOS level is quite high, which is consistent with a parasitic infection.

I should add that for nearly everyone providers won’t allow a dose of 75 at once, but in my case I’ve demonstrated a very high tolerance, and have some health issues that make hosting for longer periods difficult, so my provider was willing to make a rare exception.

How am I feeling? Fantastic. Today Spring has sprung, the air is so loaded with pollen you can see it blowing in the wind. This year I can smell all sorts of flowers and other plants in the breeze, which is a nice change of pace. In previous allergy seasons when I was not hosting hookworm I was stuck inside, huddled in a dark room next to an air purifier, and shoveling down vitamin C, the only antihistamine I could tolerate. So the scent of Spring is a wonderful, new thing.

It’s a joy to have no asthma, no sinus trouble, and my mood is also really balanced. I have more energy, no more insomnia, my skin is clearing up (less rosacea), constipation (one of many side effects of levaquin) is gone, and I’m starting to gain some healthy weight: 6 ft tall, and 160 lbs. After being underweight for the last 10 years, this is a major milestone. I now weigh what I did before I got sick with ulcerative colitis. On the IBD front, I have not had a flare in a year or more, and the last one was brief, and quite mild.

Besides the hookworm protocol, I am drinking home-brewed kefir daily, and eating raw, organic sauerkraut a few days a week. I have adopted a lower-fat “mediterranean paleo” diet, designed to keep my lipid profile optimized. This seems to be encouraging good gut flora diversity, too.

Apologies for not updating this blog sooner. I’ve been busy working, holding down more than one job, and at times working 12 days straight. Anyone who has followed my blog from the start knows how incredible this is. I feel “normal” again, but in some ways I feel better than I have in about 15 years. Seriously!

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Eat, to avoid allergies.

Overall, my progress has been quite good with helminthic therapy, but tonight (day 58 post-inoculation) I had another allergic episode. It wasn’t as bad as some have been in the past, but I did need to shovel down a fair amount of vitamin C, maybe ten 1,000 mg tablets, though the course of it. This was unpleasant, as always, but I was able to gather what seems like really important information from the event.

It occurred to me these attacks always happen around the same time — mid afternoon to early evening. I wondered if maybe the helminths tend to be more active during those hours. Then another conclusion presented itself: low blood sugar. Most of the recent “worm flu” events I’ve had are consistent with getting caught up in work and skipping meals. On the days where I’ve been less focused on tasks, and eating solid meals, I seem to do just fine. So I quickly fixed a bowl of yogurt, added fresh blueberries, a dash of stevia, and a shot of whipping cream, for some extra calories. Not ten minutes later, my allergic response (congested nose, tinnitis and tightening throat) disappeared.

That got me wondering if there might be a connection between low blood sugar, histamines, and generalized allergic reactions. Lo and behold, there seems to be a solid correlation. In fact, the more I looked, the more it appeared to be the case — autoimmune issues, histamine intolerance, food and seasonal allergies, may be exacerbated by a lack of “fuel” — even conditions as far-ranging as narcolepsy. So next time you feel that “worm flu” coming on, take some time out and feed yourself. And if you want to steer clear of it all day long, eat frequent small meals with plenty of protein, as this is the best way of coping with hypoglycemia, from what I’ve read.

Necator Americanus & Trichuris Trichiura

So I’ve got 55 hookworms now, Necator Americanus to be exact, and 500 Trichuris Trichiura whipworms. Together, they brought about a growing and intense well being, starting a day or so after I was inoculated. I could breathe through my nose, fully, for the first time in many years. I could smell the chill in the morning spring air as I made my way outside, amidst a torrent of tree-fluff allergens that would have had me gagging with asthma, and running for HEPA-filtered air, just days earlier.

Shortly thereafter, the skin on this 40-something’s face was becoming soft and smooth, not rough and inflamed, as it has been for so long. What a time machine. I ran my fingers through my hair, which even felt a bit softer, too, and noticed the seborrheic dermatitis was easing. The scaly patches that had dogged me since my late teens were giving way to a normal scalp, the redness around my mouth and nose was becoming clear and… normal. Never before has “normal” been such a wonderful word.

I tried wheat, and sugar, even beer, and tolerated all of it. Merely days ago this forbidden menu might have sent me to the ER with a flare of ulcerative colitis. Yes, it can be dangerous to throw caution to the wind, and make such drastic changes, so I soon backed off the accelerator, and stuck with my low carb diet. But it was an incredible triumph to have a bread pudding… and live to type about it.

This “bounce” lasted for five glorious days. Then, as quickly as it came, it went. Such euphoria is a normal reaction to helminthic therapy, as I’ve come to understand, for a small and lucky subset. Some who do “HT” never bounce at all, so in this sense I felt doubly fortunate: first, to be successfully hosting them, and second, to have had such a strong initial response as they entered my bloodstream.

Inoculation day was April 25, 2011. I took two hookworm doses over two days — 35, and then 20 more. About 15 minutes after application, a “ground itch” developed at their entry site on my arm, which was quite mild. I also drank a tiny vial of 500 Trichuris Trichiura human whipworm ova on day one, which were suspended in saline solution. Apart from the concept, their entrance was utterly uneventful. *Gulp* Bon appetit.

 

 

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